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Signing

KAMI Blue is open source and publically auditable. You can view the full source code here: https://github.com/kami-blue/client

Commits are signed by both l1ving and iBuyMountainDew, with releases being published by l1ving. Both members have full write access to the organization, with both members having 2fa protection on their Github Account. Nobody else has push access to any kami-blue repository.

If a commit is not signed, it is imperative that you check the contents of the commit yourself, if you’d like to be sure it is safe (ie a pull request was merged without signed commits).

Keep in mind, the likelyhood of having a Github account with 2fa and proper password security being hacked is extremely low. L1ving uses a 12 word + special characters standard, with a physical 2fa key, which is virtually uncrackable in the heat death of the universe, along with Github hashing the password, and the commits being signed by 4096 bit RSA, with iBuyMountainDew using similar security

Verifying

First import L1ving’s public key with this command

curl https://kamiblue.org/pgp.asc | gpg --import

Then download both the release and signature files (below).

Then you run this command in a directory with both of the downloaded files.

gpg --verify KAMI-Blue-2.01.01-release.jar.sig

Keep in mind this requires you have gnupg or an alternative installed.

You should get an output similar to this

gpg: assuming signed data in 'KAMI-Blue-2.01.01-release.jar'
gpg: Signature made Sat Jun  6 04:20:00 2020 EDT
gpg:                using RSA key F0BC7BF440E30845DFCC4BC5B4A5A6DCA70F861F
gpg: Good signature from "Dominika Sokolov <sokolov.dominika@gmail.com>" [ultimate]

If you don’t get “Good signature”, or it isn’t signed by F0BC7BF440E30845DFCC4BC5B4A5A6DCA70F861F then you should NOT use this release, it means it’s been hijacked (or more likely, l1ving forgot to sign it properly, but it’s better to be safe then sorry)

You will get a message saying “This key is not certified with a trusted signature!”. This just means that not enough trusted people have publically signed my (l1ving’s) key to verify that I am a real person. As long as the key matches the https://keybase.io/l1ving profile, then it’s mine. Feel free to help out by signing my key!

2.01.01 release 2.01.01 release sig